Gold Medal

Contest of the Week

Check back here weekly for a new Coal Ash Question. Everyone who submits a correct answer will be entered in a drawing for some cool Citizens for Recycling First gear!

Seventh Contest Winner… Next Quiz Question!

After a hiatus for a few weeks, we have a winner for our seventh quiz question!  Mike Duerre of Walhalla, North Dakota, was selected at random from the ten correct responders to our last coal ash question.

But before we get to the correct response, here is the contest question for this week:  What percentage of coal ash is recycled in the United States each year?

If you think you know the answer, e-mail it along with your name and contact information to info@recyclingfirst.org.

Last week’s question was:  When a ton of coal fly ash is used to replace a ton of portland cement in the production of concrete, approximately how many tons of carbon dioxide emissions are avoided?

The correct answer:  Approximately one ton!  Manufacturing portland cement is an energy intensive process. Coal fly ash is produced when coal is burned to generate electricity, so we might as well use it to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from cement manufacturing.  Almost 11 million tons of greenhouse gas emissions were avoided this way in the United States in 2007 alone.

Congratulations, Mike!


 

 Using coal ash in concrete reduces greenhouse gas emissions that are linked to climate change.


Posted by: on: Jul 29, 2010 @ 03:13

Sixth Contest Winner… Next Quiz Question!

We have a winner for our sixth quiz question!  Caleb Kruse of Colorado Springs, Colorado, was selected at random from the nine correct responders to our last coal ash question.

But before we get to the correct response, here is the contest question for this week:  When a ton of coal fly ash is used to replace a ton of portland cement in the production of concrete, approximately how many tons of carbon dioxide emissions are avoided?

If you think you know the answer, e-mail it along with your name and contact information to info@recyclingfirst.org.

Last week’s question was: What percentage of America’s electricity is generated by burning coal?

The correct answer:  Approximately 50 percent! While the United States is making great strides toward conserving electricity and generating more of it from renewable energy sources, the nation also continues to grow and find new uses for electricity.  Bigger homes, cell phones, computers, even cars that run on electricity are all examples of Americans consuming increasing amounts of electricity – meaning that coal will continue to be a significant energy resource for many years to come.  Recycling the ash that remains after coal is consumed is one important way we can make the resource cleaner.

Congratulations, Caleb!



The Chevy Volt – Your electric car will be running on coal half of the time!

 

Posted by: on: Apr 16, 2010 @ 01:18

Fifth Contest Winner… Next Quiz Question!

We have a winner for our fifth quiz question! Reva Skie of Lees Summit, Missouri, was selected at random from the 13 correct responders to last week’s coal ash question.

But before we get to the correct response, here is the contest question for this week:  What percentage of America’s electricity is generated by burning coal?

If you think you know the answer, e-mail it along with your name and contact information to info@recyclingfirst.org.

Last week’s question was: What is the name of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s program that actively promotes the recycling of coal ash?

The correct answer:  The Coal Combustion Products Partnership, or “C2P2” program. The program was created in 2003.  It is a cooperative effort between EPA and the American Coal Ash Association (ACAA), Utility Solid Waste Activities Group (USWAG), Department of Energy (DOE), Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and the United States Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) to “promote the beneficial use of coal combustion products (CCPs) and the environmental benefits that result from their use.”  You can visit the program’s web site here: http://www.epa.gov/epawaste/partnerships/c2p2/index.htm.

Congratulations, Reva!



Posted by: on: Mar 26, 2010 @ 10:29

Fourth Contest Winner… Next Quiz Question!

 We have a winner for our fourth quiz question!  Toni Radtke of Dairyland Power Cooperative – an electrical generation and transmission cooperative headquartered in La Crosse, Wisconsin – was selected at random from the 10 correct responders to last week’s coal ash question.

But before we get to the correct response, here is the contest question for this week:  What is the name of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s program that actively promotes the recycling of coal ash?

If you think you know the answer, e-mail it along with your name and contact information to info@recyclingfirst.org.

Last week’s question was: What temple to all the gods of ancient Rome is a nearly 1900-year-old example of the durability of concrete made with ash?

The correct answer:  The Pantheon. The Pantheon was constructed using volcanic ash, which has mechanical and chemical properties similar to coal ash. Its most famous feature is a 142-foot high dome with a central opening at its peak. After nearly 19 centuries, it remains the world's largest unreinforced concrete dome and a testament to the durability of concrete containing ash.

Congratulations, Toni!


 



Posted by: on: Mar 11, 2010 @ 01:04

Third Contest Winner… Next Quiz Question!

We have a winner for our third quiz question!  Robert Mullen of Brutoco Engineering & Construction – a heavy/civil engineering and utility construction firm headquartered in Fontana California – was selected at random from the 12 correct responders to last week’s coal ash question.

But before we get to his correct response, here is the contest question for this week:  What temple to all the gods of ancient Rome is a nearly 1900-year-old example of the durability of concrete made with ash?

If you think you know the answer, e-mail it along with your name and contact information to info@recyclingfirst.org.

Last week’s question was: What is the name of the world’s tallest building – which happened to use coal fly ash in its construction?

The correct answer:  The Khalifa Tower in Dubai.  At 2,717 feet, it is the tallest manmade structure ever built.  The building’s concrete mixtures used fly ash at a variety of cement replacement rates – from 13 percent in the superstructure to 25 percent in the foundation and 40 percent in the piled-raft mix.

Congratulations, Robert!



Posted by: on: Feb 26, 2010 @ 04:37

Second Contest Winner… Next Quiz Question!

We have our second big winner!  Mark Connelly of CalPortland Company – a construction materials provider based in southern California – was selected at random from the 11 correct responders to last week’s coal ash question.

But before we get to his correct response, here is the contest question for this week:

What is the name of the world’s tallest building – which happened to use coal fly ash in its construction?

If you think you know the answer, e-mail it along with your name and contact information to info@recyclingfirst.org.

Last week’s question was: What historic site in North Dakota hosts the nation’s most comprehensive demonstration of the variety of ways coal ash can be recycled in building materials?

The correct answer:  The Headwaters Fort Mandan Visitor Center in Washburn, North Dakota.  This remarkable building on the banks of the Missouri River welcomes visitors to the site where Lewis and Clark spent the winter of 1804-05. Nearly every component of the visitor center’s construction contains coal combustion products.  Learn more by clicking here: http://www.headwaters.com/fortmandan/

Congratulations, Mark!


 


Posted by: on: Feb 18, 2010 @ 07:19

First Contest Winner… Next Quiz Question!

We have a winner!  Sue Arnold of CMT Engineering Laboratories – a construction material testing and inspection laboratory – was selected at random from the seven correct responders to last week’s coal ash question.

But before we get to her correct response, here is the contest question for this week:

What historic site in North Dakota hosts the nation’s most comprehensive demonstration of the variety of ways coal ash can be recycled in building materials?

If you think you know the answer, e-mail it along with your name and contact information to info@recyclingfirst.org.

Last week’s question was: What landmark building in our nation’s capital was constructed using concrete containing coal ash and now houses offices of the people who will decide whether coal ash is hazardous?

The correct answer:  The Ariel Rios Federal Build­ing, headquarters for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, contains concrete made using coal fly ash! A photo of the building is below.

Congratulations, Sue!




Posted by: on: Feb 09, 2010 @ 03:33

Here’s Our First Quiz Question…

What landmark building in our nation’s capital was constructed using concrete containing coal ash and now houses offices of the people who will decide whether coal ash is hazardous?

If you think you know the answer, e-mail it along with your name and contact information to info@recyclingfirst.org.

Posted by: on: Jan 28, 2010 @ 02:50